Brisbane Lions Fans Demand Jumper Vote

Our Jumper, Our Say - Fans Demand a Vote

The return of the Brisbane Lions’ traditional jumper for two matches this year has prompted members and supporters to renew their call for a vote on the current jumper design.

In late 2009, the Lions unexpectedly changed its logo and jumper to the image known colloquially as the “paddlepop lion”.  The move was made after no consultation with members and supporters.

With a new Chairman and CEO at the helm of the club, The Lions Roar is calling for a member vote on the jumper design, citing independent research that the issue is highly divisive among fans.  

The campaign has garnered significant interest, with more than 600 fans registering their support in just two days, with no sign of easing up.

The AFL is seeing a return back to traditionally designed jumpers, often prompted by a push from fans.  Port Adelaide, Western Bulldogs and the West Coast Eagles have all reverted to more traditional jumpers after experimenting with modernised designs.  Other clubs like Richmond, Collingwood and Essendon have kept jumper changes to a minimum over many years.

The Lion's Roar spokesman Adam Staines says, “We’ve heard a lot of dissatisfaction with how the Board went about changing the jumper in 2009.  There was a real lack of consultation and respect for members and supporters.  That bred significant disenchantment with the club’s administration which lingers today.  

“The jumper is so important to the identity, culture and heritage of a football club. The number of fans registering with us via our website shows that people still feel passionate about this issue.

“The Board should be about serving the members and supporters.  To do that, they have to ask us what we want.  We want the club to give members and supporters the chance to vote on this issue.  That’s what the club should have done 4 years ago.  It is time to right that wrong.”

The Lion's Roar has put out a call for Lions members and supporters to register on the organisation’s website www.thelionsroar.net.  It has also asked for fans to write letters to the club to call for a vote on this issue, citing the club’s indifference to email and social media feedback as an impediment to getting the message through.

Staines says: “There are good people on the Board but they are perpetuating a bad decision made by the previous administration.  We support the current Board and are hopeful that this campaign prompts them to do the right thing and give fans a vote. But if they continue to ignore members, we have been collecting proxies should a Board challenge be required.  Hopefully, it won’t come to that.”